C’mon, Mann: The Last of the Mohicans (2022)

In the world of Michael Mann, no successful justice is wholly righteous, no bad deed is without a thrill, and whether physical, historical, social or existential, everything boils down to an act of violence. Some may argue that if you’ve seen one of Mann’s often bleak, typically brooding and always beautiful meditations, you’ve seen them all —the buffet ofbokeh cinematography, the ominous electronic soundscapes and, more recently, washed-out digital cinematography that seems captured on a refurbished BlackBerry someone then dropped on the ground. But no modern director feels as attuned to crime’s contradictions, the perils of punitive pursuits and the roiling emotions running through both. And few action filmmakers so invigoratingly depict the deliberate tension and swift snap of violence. To the naysayers this month, we say … C’mon, Mann.

The Last of the Mohicans(1992) is one of my all-time favorite films, for reasons that I hope to do justice in this review, but I’ll try to discuss it dispassionately. The film is co-written and directed byMichael Mann. Mann is a filmmaker of whom I admit I’m not much of a fan; with the exceptions of The Jericho Mile (1979, starring Peter Strauss) and Ali(2001, starringWill Smith),I don’t like Mann’s other work. For the few out there who haven’t seen it, it is an Americanpseudo-historical epic drama, set in 1757 during theFrench and Indian War, which was the North American theater of theSeven Years’ War, during whichFranceandGreat Britainfought over control of North America.

Based on James Fenimore Cooper’s 1826 novelThe Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757. The novel is a rather boring read that, like Mann’s film, takes liberties with historical facts. Both the novel and various film and TV adaptations contain some historical truths: both the French and the British armies usedNative Americanas scouts, guides, and allies; outnumbered by the British, the French were more dependent upon Native American aid than were the British; the Algonquians (Mohican) and Iroquois (Mohawk) were traditional competitors and enemies and those traditions determined which side of the War the various tribes supported. Cooperbased his novel,The Last of the Mohicans, on the Mohican tribe, but his depiction of them includes aspects of theMohegan cultural, including Mohegan names, like Uncas. At the time of Cooper’s writing, the Mohegan were a separate Algonquian tribe associated with eastern Connecticut. Cooper set his novel in and around Lake George, New York, in the Hudson Valley, which was historically Mohican land.

In the novel, British soldiers and Colonel Munro’s two daughters, Alice and Cora, are traveling to Fort William Henry, where Munro is the commander. Guarding the travelers are frontiersmanNathaniel “Natty” Bumppo (aka Hawkeye in the 1992 film), British officer Major Duncan Heyward, three Native Americans: Magua (a Mohawk), Chingachgook,and his son Uncas (both Mohicans). These characters represent a microcosm of budding American culture at the time: three Native Americans from differing cultures, a bunch of French and British soldier/colonists, including the Munro sisters and Major Heyward (all British), and Natty Bumppo ~ child of white parents, he grew up amongNative Americansand was educated byMoravian Christians. Bumppo is a fearless warrior skilled in pretty much all weaponry, especially thelong rifle. In Cooper’s novels, Bumppo is usually traveling around with hisMohicanfoster brother,Chingachgook (thus, Uncas is Bumppo’s nephew, unlike the films where Uncas and Hawkeye are the biological and foster sons, respectively, of Chingachgook).

For those unfamiliar with Bumppo, he is the main character in a series of novels by Cooper, collectively called the Leatherstocking Tales. In order of publication, and with a notation of the years they cover, the Leatherstocking Tales are:

  • The Pioneers: The Sources of the Susquehanna; A Descriptive Tale (published in 1823, set in 1793).
  • Mohicans (published in 1826, set in 1757).
  • The Prairie: A Tale (published in 1827, set in 1804).
  • The Pathfinder: The Inland Sea (published in 1840, set in 1758-59).
  • The Deerslayer: The First War Path (published in 1841, set from 1740 to 1755).

The narrative settings don’t follow in the same order as the dates of publication, which is confusing. Adding to the confusion, the character Natty Bumppo had a lot of nicknames. Before The Deerslayer timeline, he was known as Straight-Tongue, The Pigeon, and the Lap-Ear. After obtaining his first rifle (in The Deerslayer), he gained the nickname, Deerslayer. He is also known as Hawkeye andLa Longue CarabineinThe Last of the Mohicans, as Pathfinder inThe Pathfinder, or The Inland Sea, as Leatherstocking inThe Pioneers, and as the trapper inThe Prairie.

I read all those books when I was a kid — between grade school and high school — and I can tell you that they are what we used to call “boys books” because there’s not much in ’em to interest girls (of any era). They were clearly written by a man who had no interest in girls ever reading them.

Bumppo has been in several adaptions ofThe Last of the Mohicans: he was portrayed byHarry Lorraineinthe 1920 film version, byHarry Careyinthe 1932 film serial version, byRandolph Scottinthe 1936 film version, byKenneth Ivesinthe 1971 BBC serial, bySteve Forrestinthe 1977 TV movie,and byDaniel Day-Lewisinthe 1992 film version. This review focuses on Michael Mann’s1992 film, with a bit of background info on George B. Seitz’s 1936 film because it was more influential on the 1992 film than was the original novel. For example, the films both share “invented” romances between the two Munro sisters and the two heroes, Hawkeye and Uncas, that aren’t in the original novel ~ thank goodness for those made-up romances, because without ’em, both films would just be two more standard-issue Hollywood bromance war movies. In the 1992 film, Natty Bumppo’s name is changed to Nathaniel Poe (with the nickname Hawkeye), and, as in the 1936 film, Hawkeye is the adopted son of Chingachgook, and he and Uncas are brothers.

(Video) Clannad - I WIll Find You (Theme from The Last Of The Mohicans) (Live)

For those interested inthe 1936 film, along with Randolph Scott, it also starred Binnie Barnes (Alice Munro), Heather Angel (Cora Munro), Henry Wilcoxon (Major Duncan Heyward), Bruce Cabot (Magua), Robert Barrat (Chingachgook), and Phillip Reed (Uncas). Mann’s 1992’s The Last of the Mohicans starsDaniel Day-Lewis(Hawkeye), Wes Studi (Magua), Madeleine Stowe (Cora Munro),Jodhi May (Alice Munro),Russell Means (Chingachgook),Eric Schweig (Uncas), andSteven Waddington(Mayor Duncan Heyward). If you watch both films, note that the names of the Munro sisters are switched in the 1992 film from what they are in the 1936 film; I honestly don’t remember which sister was named what in the original novel.

Released on September 25, 1991, Mann’sThe Last of the Mohicanswas met with mostly positive reviews and commercial success during its box-office run. Critics praised Dante Spinotti’s cinematography and the musical score (more on that in a bit). It won theAcademy Award for Best Sound (Chris Jenkins,Doug Hemphill,Mark Smith,Simon Kaye), which is the only Oscar ever won by a film directed by Mann. Roger Ebert called it “quite an improvement on Cooper’s all but unreadable book, and a worthy successor to the Randolph Scott version.” Desson Howe of The Washington Post called the film a “glam-opera” and “the MTV version of gothic romance” — and those are not inaccurate descriptions! Rita Kempley, also of the Post, said the film “sets new standards when it comes to pent-up passion” and commended the “spectacular scenery.” The Rotten Tomatoes summary calls it a “breathless romantic adventure that plays loose with history and comes out with a richer action movie for it.” Excuse me … what?! Rotten Tomatoes doesn’t think the actual historical brutality of the French and Indian War was “rich” enough for an action film? OK, whatever: they should’ve stopped with “plays loose with history.”

Historical accuracy or lack thereof notwithstanding, I do love this film. One of the reasons that I love this film is that it is so beautifully filmed. From start to finish, it is gorgeous. I’ve never seen it on the big screen, but I imagine its beauty is enhanced when viewed in that scale. Another reason I love it is the incredible soundtrack, which fits the film perfectly. I listened to the soundtrack whilst writing this review. It features music byTrevor JonesandRandy Edelman. The heartachingly thrumming main theme of the film is taken from the tune “The Gael” byScottishsinger-songwriterDougie MacLean. Man, it is so effective! Then there’s the incredibly haunting song, “I Will Find You,” byClannad. I well up with tears just thinking about that song.

A few notes on the cast: it is all but perfect. Jodhi May (Alice Munro),Russell Means (Chingachgook),Eric Schweig (Uncas), andSteven Waddington(Heyward) are excellent. Like the scenery and the score, their characters merge together seamlessly and believably throughout the film. The klunker in the casting is Madeleine Stowe (Cora Munro). I’m not a fan of hers in anything; she’s a Ruinator in my book. I always wonder how she ever got any parts. God knows how Stowe got this one; she’s absolutely awful as Cora, especially opposite Day-Lewis’ Hawkeye. Stowe exudes nothing that allows one to believe that anyone, let alone oh-so-hunky Hawkeye, would be attracted to her. I ought to mention that, as written in the film, Cora’s romantic (read: “sexual”) behavior is not really historically accurate, but who cares ~ we need some sexy, right? Unfortunately, Madeleine Stowe just isn’t sexy. It’s impossible to believe that Hawkeye would direct his gloriously dark brooding lustful eyes and his gloriously brooding pent-up sexual energy that emanates from his lithe muscular body towards . . . her. In those scenes, I’m always trying to look past Stowe to see upon whom he’s really set his sexual oops I mean romantic sights.

Ask pretty much anyone my age, male or female, and they’ll probably agree with me that Day-Lewis, with his aquiline features, his tall figure clad in buckskin, his burning eyes, and all that flowing black hair, is simply breathtakingly beautiful to watch in this film. I’m not saying Day-Lewis’ acting is great in every scene, but he gets the job done and done really well in some scenes! I confess that it is because of how lovely-to-look-at Day-Lewis is in this film that forevermore I’ve watched him in anything.

Then there’s Wes Studi: I’ll also watch him in anything, for a slightly different reason. When my kids were little and the film would come on TV, of course I “had to” watch it because I loved it, even though I knew my kids were rather terrified of Magua. We called him MaguaBadIndian, spoken as it’s written there —all one word. I still whisper MaguaBadIndian to myself when Studi comes onscreen in anything, but I whisper it with joy and affection. He was so damn good as that scary character that forevermore I’ve loved watching him. Studi is perfectly cast as the menacing yet masculinely lethal Magua; when he’s onscreen, you can’t take your eyes off of him. Studi’s portrayal is chilling, he’s unbelievably believable as this psychotic revenge-fueled madman. Studi’s expressionless expressions work their magic, especially in the closeup camera work in scenes where the camera goes from his face to the face of a Munro sister or other character. Magua may be expressionless, but Studi’s eyes just burn through the screen. Then there are the scenes where Magua’s in hand-to-hand combat ~ there’s a fixed physical intensity in him that makes you believe (fear) he cannot be beaten . . . ever. The terror wrought by Studi’s Magua stays with you long after the film ends.

The movie itself begins in 1757 during the French and Indian War. British Army Major Duncan Heyward arrives in Albany, New York, where he is assigned to serve under Colonel Edmund Munro. Munro is the commander of Fort William Henry in the Adirondack Mountains. Heyward’s first job is to escort some soldiers and Munro’s two daughters, fiery Cora and gentle Alice, to their father. He seems to have known the Munro family for a while, because before they leave Albany, Heyward asks Cora to marry him (she does not give him an answer, and it seems that’s pretty much been her response to his romantic shenanigans for quite some time). A quite Mohawk named Magua has been selected as their guide.

Now, the audience can tell pretty early on that Magua is actually a ruthless psycho nutbag. But our poor party of Brits doesn’t have a clue. It is soon obvious to us, the audience, that Magua is also not even a Mohawk ~ he’s actually a Huron determined to lead our heroes into an ambush (the Huron are allied with the French). Magua is working against the British in general, with the specific personal goal of vengeance against Colonel Munro, whom Magua blames for the deaths of his own children.

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Seeing the ambush occur from the forest where they are hunting, Chingachgook, his gentle son Uncas, and his white adopted son, Hawkeye, decide to intervene. We understand their actions are not really politically motivated; it’s more that they have a moral duty to help the British party because they can see it has been tricked into an ambush. The three men kill the attacking Hurons (except Magua, who escapes) and agree to escort the survivors, including the Munro sisters and Major Heyward (who harbors an unrequited love for Cora), onward to Fort William Henry. As the journey progresses, so do the romances between Cora and Hawkeye — with lots of steamy glances exchanged — and Uncas and Alice. Uncas is a gentle soul and Alice is a shy young woman; their romance progresses in much more subtle moments.

They arrive at the fort to find it besieged by the French and their Huron allies, but our heroic band sneaks in. Colonel Munro is surprised to see them, certain the fort will fall. Indeed, all of the Europeans in this story clearly fear that white women will be captured and enslaved by the Huron, a fate worse than death. Meanwhile, Heyward, seeing a relationship growing between Hawkeye and Cora, becomes more and more jealous of Hawkeye, especially after Cora finally tells Heyward she will not marry him. In one memorable scene, Hawkeye and Cora’s romance progresses (both fully clothed, but it still feels like softcore porn).

A desperate Colonel Munro refuses to honor his prior agreement with the group of militiamen serving under him that they could leave the fort to protect their own homesteads from the French and the Huron. The ever-fair-minded Hawkeye helps the militiamen sneak away to protect their families and is then arrested for sedition and sentenced to hang. He’s imprisoned when the French and Huron launch their final attacks on the fort. Without any British Army reinforcements, Munro is forced to surrender and accept French General Montcalm’s offer: the British soldiers may leave the fort honorably with their arms, and the civilians (male and female) may go with them. Because Hawkeye is technically a civilian, he is spared the hangman’s noose and is released with the rest of the fort’s inhabitants.

Fair warning: from this moment on, I can’t stay unemotional while watching the movie nor can I stop from revealing the remainder of the film’s narrative. Every scene is choreographed to perfection and, as always, the musical score builds with each moment, adding a crescendo of emotion to the rest of the film.

Magua is furious because Montcalm’s deal with the British robs him of his chance to kill Munro. Once Munro, his soldiers, and the civilians leave the fort, Magua and his Huron warriors attack them, and a massacre ensues. Magua kills Munro, cutting out his still-beating heart. Hawkeye, Uncas, and Chingachgook fight their way out, taking with them Cora, Alice, Heyward, and a few others. They make it to a cave behind a waterfall, but they know Magua and his Hurons are rapidly approaching. There’s no time. They can already hear the Huron fighting with British stragglers. Hawkeye, Uncas, and Chingachgook believe the women and Heyward have a better chance of surviving without them because Magua’s warriors far outnumber them: if they stay, there will be a battle to the death for all; if they go, they believe Magua will take the Munro sisters alive as captives and keep Heyward alive to sell to another tribe or ransom to the British. Everyone knows the Munro sisters’ ultimate fate with Magua — the fate that’s worse than death.

In a most dramatic and passionate cinematic moment, at the edge of the thundering waterfall, Hawkeye shouts to Cora, “You stay alive! If they don’t kill you, they’ll take you north, up to Huron lands. You submit, do you hear?! You’re strong! You survive! You stay alive no matter what occurs! I will find you … no matter how long it takes, no matter how far —I will find you!” It is simultaneously a promise and an entreaty for her not to kill herself (rather than “submit”). It is also a speech that proves Hawkeye’s love for her is more progressive than the time period’s cultural norms (remember that “fate worse than death” stuff?). Corny as it may seem, it is actually a thrilling moment. Hawkeye, Uncas, and Chingachgook jump into the waterfall and disappear; if they survive the fall, their plan is to come after Magua and rescue Heyward and the Munro sisters. Magua and his Hurons appear in the cave; Heyward tries to fight them off, but he and the sisters are quickly captured.

The next scenes are scary, emotional, and well-filmed from every perspective. And there’s a lot of exhaustion-inspiring, theme song-enhanced, desperate running by Hawkeye, Uncas, and Chingachgook —racing against time over far distances, mostly uphill.

Magua takes his three prisoners to a Huron settlement, making demands of the sachem (the tribe’s paramount chief), speechifying eloquently about himself in third person. He tells the crowd what a great warrior he is, how he deserves to be treated with respect. He demands the Munro sisters be granted to him as wives to bear his children, to replace the children he’s lost. Suddenly, an unarmed Hawkeye walks into the settlement to plead with the sachem for the lives of the Munro sisters and Heyward, who acts as Hawkeye’s interpreter. The sachem rules that Heyward is to be returned to the British, Alice is to be given to Magua for the wrongs done to him by her father, and Cora must be burned alive in sacrifice. Magua, angry at the sachem’s decision, drags Alice away. As Cora is dragged to a pyre, the sachem states Hawkeye may leave in peace for his bravery. Amid the chaos (everyone is shouting or crying), Hawkeye shouts instructions to Heyward to tell the sachem that he, Hawkeye, is willing to take Cora’s place. Heyward, accepting at last that Cora and Hawkeye belong together, purposefully mistranslates and offers his own life for Cora’s. The sachem nods in acquiescence.

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Understanding what Heyward has done, Hawkeye and Cora have no choice but to flee the village as Heyward is tied to the pyre and its fires lit. The couple make it well into the forest to where Chingachgook and Uncas are waiting; they give Hawkeye his long rifle. We see through Hawkeye’s viewpoint as he takes slow and careful aim across the distance — through Hawkeye’s eyes, we see Heyward burning alive, screaming silently (because of the distance). This is the shot of Hawkeye’s life: we know it, Cora knows it, Chingachgook, Uncas, and Hawkeye know it. Try not to weep when Hawkeye hits his mark, mercifully shooting Heyward right between the eyes.

Chingachgook, Uncas, Hawkeye, and Cora then race away in pursuit of Magua’s party of Hurons; they must rescue Alice. In perhaps the most devastating sequence (again enhanced by the haunting score), Uncas races ahead, up the steepest mountain, and catches up to Magua and Alice. As Alice watches, he and Magua fight brutally. There is a part of their fight that is so sorrowful, when Magua has mortally wounded Uncas —and Alice and Uncas know it —but Uncas keeps trying. Magua delivers the fatal blow and kicks Uncas’ lifeless body off the mountain. Cora, Hawkeye, and Chingachgook see Uncas’ body fall past them. I dare you not to be full-on crying by then. (I’m crying just remembering that moment.)

Magua turns to Alice and peremptorily gestures for her to come with him, but Alice chooses to be with Uncas: it is such a poignant scene. Standing at the edge of the mountaintop, Alice looks over her shoulder down to where Uncas’ body lies, then she looks back directly at Magua (with an expression I cannot even describe), and slowly just leans back and falls away to her death. Magua looks a little taken aback by her choice, but then he just turns away; he really doesn’t care.

Hawkeye and Chingachgook catch up to Magua’s Hurons and together kill most of them. Hawkeye then holds off the rest, knowing that it is for Chingachgook to avenge his son Uncas. Everyone, including Chingachgook and Magua, understands this is a hand-to-hand duel to the death. The first time I saw this movie, I was so scared for the outcome I couldn’t breathe. By this time in the film, you really do feel like Magua cannot be beaten and yet Chingachgook must win. After a brutal fight, Chingachgook kills Magua. Rarely is a cinematic “bad guy’s” death so satisfying yet so bittersweet because of course it comes too late for Heyward, Uncas, and Alice.

In the final scene of the film (and I dare you not to well up with tears), Hawkeye, Cora, and Chingachgook stand together atop the beautiful mountain facing a sunset horizon. Chingachgook releases his son’s ashes into the winds, praying to the Great Spirit to receive the spirit of his son, Uncas. In his p

A desperate Colonel Munro refuses to honor his prior agreement with the militiamen that they could leave the fort to protect their own homesteads from the French and the Huron. The ever-fair-minded Hawkeye helps the militiamen sneak away to protect their families, and then is arrested for sedition and sentenced to hang. He’s imprisoned when the French and Huron launch their final attacks on the fort. Without any British Army reinforcements, Munro is forced to surrender and accept French General Montcalm’s offer: the British soldiers may leave the fort honorably with their arms, and the civilians (male and female) may go with them. Because Hawkeye is technically a civilian, he is spared the hangman’s noose and is released with the rest of the fort’s inhabitants.

Fair warning, from this moment on, I can’t stay unemotional. Every scene is choreographed to perfection, and ~ as always ~ the musical score builds with each moment, adding a crescendo of emotion to the rest of the film.

Magua is furious because Montcalm’s deal with the British robs him of his chance to kill Munro. Once Munro, his soldiers, and the civilians leave the fort, Magua and his Huron warriors attack them, and a massacre ensues. Magua kills Munro, cutting out his still-beating heart. Hawkeye, Uncas, and Chingachgook fight their way out, taking Cora, Alice, Heyward, and a few others. They make it to a cave behind a waterfall, but they know that Magua and his Hurons are going to catch up with them quickly ~ there’s no time; they can already hear Magua’s Hurions fighting with the stragglers from their group. The three men believe the women and Heyward have a better chance of surviving without them, because Magua’s warriors far outnumber them and if they stay, there will be a battle to the death for all; if they go, they believe Magua take the Munro sisters alive as captives and will keep Heyward alive to sell to another tribe or ransom to the British. Hawkeye, Uncas, and Chingachgook know the Munro sisters’ fate with Magua: that fate that’s worse than death.

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In a most dramatic and passionate cinematic moment, at the edge of the thundering waterfall, Hawkeye shouts to Cora, “You stay alive! If they don’t kill you, they’ll take you north, up to Huron lands. You submit, do you hear?! You’re strong! You survive! You stay alive no matter what occurs! I will find you . . . no matter how long it takes, no matter how far ~ I will find you!” It is a promise, it is an entreaty for her not to kill herself (rather than “submit”), it is a speech that proves his love for her is more progressive than the time period’s cultural norms (remember that “fate worse than death” stuff). Corny as it may seem, it is actually a thrilling moment. Hawkeye, Uncas, and Chingachgook jump into the waterfall and disappear; if they survive the fall, their plan is to come after Magua and rescue Heyward and the Munro sisters. Magua and his Hurons appear in the cave; Heyward tries to fight them off, but he and the sisters are quickly captured.

The next scenes are scary, emotional, and well-filmed from every perspective. And there’s a lot of exhaustion-inspiring, theme song enhanced, desperate running by Hawkeye, Uncas, and Chingachgook ~ they are racing against time over far distances, mostly uphill.

Magua takes his three prisoners to a Huron settlement, making demands of the sachem (the tribe’s paramount chief), speechifying eloquently about himself in third person. He tells the crowd what a great warrior he is, how he deserves to be treated with respect; he demands the Munro sisters be granted to him as wives to bear his children, to replace the children he’s lost. Suddenly, an unarmed Hawkeye walks into the settlement, to plead with sachem for the lives of the Munro sisters and Heyward, who acts as Hawkeye’s interpreter. The sachem rules that Heyward is to be returned to the British, Alice is to be given to Magua for the wrongs done to him by her father, and Cora must be burned alive in sacrifice. Magua, angry at the sachem’s decision, drags Alice away. As Cora is dragged to a pyre, the sachem states that Hawkeye may leave in peace for his bravery. Amidst the chaos (everyone is shouting and/or crying), Hawkeye shouts instructions to Heyward to tell the sachem that he, Hawkeye, is willing to take Cora’s place. Heyward, accepting at last that Cora and Hawkeye belong together, purposefully mistranslates and offers his own life for Cora’s. The sachem nods in acquiescence. Hawkeye and Cora have no choice but to flee the village as Heyward is tied to the pyre and its fires are lit. The couple make it well into the forest to where Chingachgook and Uncas are waiting; they give Hawkeye his long rifle. We see through Hawkeye’s viewpoint as he takes slow and careful aim across the distance: we see Heyward burning alive, screaming silently (because of the distance).

This is the shot of Hawkeye’s life: we know it, Cora knows it, Chingachgook, Uncas, and Hawkeye know it. Try not to weep when Hawkeye hits his mark, mercifully shooting Heyward right between the eyes.

Chingachgook, Uncas, Hawkeye, and Cora then race away in pursuit of Magua’s party of Hurons; they must rescue Alice. In perhaps the most devasting sequence of scenes (again enhanced by the haunting score), Uncas races ahead, up the steepest mountain, and catches up to Magua and Alice. As Alice watches, he and Magua fight brutally. There is a part of their fight that is so sorrowful, when Magua has mortally wounded Uncas and Alice and Uncas know it ~ but Uncas keeps trying. Magua delivers the fatal blow and kicks Uncas’ lifeless body off the mountain. Cora, Hawkeye, and Chingachgook see Uncas’ body fall past them. I dare you not to be full-on crying by then (I’m crying just remembering that moment).

Magua turns to Alice and peremptorily gestures for her to come with him, but Alice chooses to be with Uncas: such a poignant scene. Standing at the edge of the mountaintop, Alice looks over her shoulder down to where Uncas’ body lies, then she looks back directly at Magua (with an expression I cannot even describe), and slowly just leans back and falls away to her death. Magua looks a little taken aback by her choice, but then he just turns away; he really doesn’t care.

Hawkeye and Chingachgook catch up to Magua’s Hurons, and together they kill most of them. Hawkeye then holds off the rest, knowing that it is for Chingachgook to avenge Uncas. Everyone, including Chingachgook and Magua, understands this is a hand-to-hand duel to the death. The first time I saw this movie, I was so scared for the outcome I couldn’t breathe ~ by this time in the film, you really do feel like Magua cannot be beaten and yet Chingachgook must win. After a brutal fight, Chingachgook kills Magua. Rarely is a cinematic “bad guy’s” death so satisfying yet so bittersweet, because of course it comes too late for Heyward, Uncas, and Alice.

In the final scene of the film (and I dare you not to well up with tears), Hawkeye, Cora, and Chingachgook stand together atop the beautiful mountain facing a sunset horizon. Chingachgook releases his son’s ashes into the winds, praying to the Great Spirit to receive the spirit of his son, Uncas. In his prayer, Chingachgook identifies himself as the last of his kind, “the last of the Mohicans.”

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Whew, what a great movie!

I just love it.

I hope you do, too.

FAQs

Do Cora and Hawkeye make love? ›

There is no romance between Hawkeye and Cora in the novel. Cora, a mulatto, is passed over by Heyward, who favors her younger sister Alice (played in the movie by Jodhi May).

Was Last of the Mohicans a true story? ›

It's likewise a wonderful flick. However hyped and mythicized it is based on a true and terrible historical event. The setting is 1756. It's a year after the battle in which Ephraim Williams gave his life, and at the same Lake George location.

Why did Alice jump in Last of the Mohicans? ›

In a powerful yet ambiguous gesture, at once imperious and needy, Magua beckons Alice with a hand stained by Uncas' blood. But Alice is so horrified by Magua's ruthlessness that she would rather leap off a cliff than become his mate.

What is the last line of Last of the Mohicans? ›

Great Spirit, and the maker of all life, a warrior goes to you swift and straight as an arrow shot into the sun. Welcome him, and let him take his place at the council fire of my people.

What happened to Alice in Last of the Mohicans? ›

Alice Munro does not die in The Last of the Mohicans. She's the 'good girl' who remains at the end to mourn her sister Cora's death.

Who does Hawkeye fall in love with in The Last of the Mohicans? ›

Cora Munro is the pampered daughter of a British Colonel, recently arrived at the frontier. Despite their differences, or perhaps because of them, Hawkeye and Cora are drawn to each other.

Are there any Mohicans still alive? ›

Today, there are about 1,500 Mohicans, with roughly half of them living on a reservation in northeastern Wisconsin. The link between the modern inhabitants of the town of Bethlehem and the descendents of its ancient people was made through physical objects.

Was there an Indian tribe called Mohicans? ›

The Mohican (/moʊˈhiːkənz/ or /məˈhiːkənz/, alternate spelling: Mahican) are an Eastern Algonquian Native American tribe that historically spoke an Algonquian language.

Where are the Mohicans today? ›

Today, the Mohicans are a federally-recognized tribe in Wisconsin, having been removed from Stockbridge to Oneida, NY, in 1785, and from there to Wisconsin in the 1820s.

How old is Alice in the last of the Mohicans? ›

Background. Refined and elegant, Alice is a young English lady of about twenty-five years old and also, Cora's older sister.

Who is Cora in the last of the Mohicans? ›

The older of Colonel Munro's two daughters, with dark hair and a strong, courageous disposition, Cora is the daughter of Munro's first wife, herself of a partly West Indian line. It is strongly implied that Uncas falls in love, in however chaste a fashion, with Cora, and Uncas fights to defend Cora from Magua.

Where was the last scene of the last of the Mohicans filmed? ›

Chimney Rock State Park is proud to have been one of the filming locations for the famous movie "Last of the Mohicans". The iconic backdrop was shown in the last 20 minutes of the movie! The waterfall scene, the fight scene and bathing scene were all filmed at Chimney Rock State Park!

Who dies at the end of the last of the Mohicans? ›

The main characters who die include Cora Munro (the elder of the two Munro sisters), Uncas (a young man who is a close friend of Hawkeye and of Mohican blood), and Magua (chief of the Huron tribe). All three of these characters perish at the novel's close when a confrontation breaks out on a cliff edge.

What are you looking at Sir the last of the Mohicans? ›

Cora Munro : What are you looking at, sir? Hawkeye : I'm looking at you, miss. Hawkeye : My father's people say that at the birth of the sun and of his brother the moon, their mother died. So the sun gave to the earth her body, from which was to spring all life.

What was the weapon Chingachgook used in Last of the Mohicans? ›

There are no special effects here. There are no fancy weapons. This battle is just about knives, rifles, and a weird weapon carried by Chingachgook (called the Gunstock Club).

What happens to Cora in The Last of the Mohicans? ›

Instead of letting Cora be united in marriage with the Indian Uncas in the end of the novel, the author decides to kill both of them.

How are Alice and Cora related? ›

Alice Munro was the half-sister of Cora. She is Colonel Munro's younger daughter by Alice Graham, his Scottish second wife.

Are Mohawks and Mohicans the same tribe? ›

The Mohawks and Mohicans lived next to each other, but they were not the same tribe. The language of the Mohawks belongs to the Iroquoian family of languages, while the Mohicans spoke Algonquian.

Who does Black Widow marry? ›

During one such assignment, she and Hawkeye were captured by General Yuri Brushov, and Natasha discovered that her husband, Alexei Shostakov was alive and had become the Red Guardian.

Are Hawkeye and Natty Bumppo the same person? ›

SUMMARY: Its principal character is Natty Bumppo, also called Hawkeye, now in middle life and at the height of his powers.

Who is the hero of the last Mohicans book? ›

Hawkeye. The novel's frontier hero, he is a woodsman, hunter, and scout. Hawkeye is the hero's adopted name; his real name is Natty Bumppo.

Who were the most violent Indian tribe? ›

The Comanches, known as the "Lords of the Plains", were regarded as perhaps the most dangerous Indians Tribes in the frontier era.

What did Mohicans eat? ›

The Mohicans were farming people. Mohican women harvested corn, squash, beans and sunflower seeds. Mohican men did most of the hunting. They shot deer, moose, turkeys, and small game, and went fishing in the river.

Which Indian tribes are extinct? ›

Pages in category "Extinct Native American tribes"
  • Accokeek tribe.
  • Accomac people.
  • Androscoggin people.
  • Annamessex.
  • Apalachee.
  • Appomattoc.
  • Assateague people.

What language do the Mohican Indians speak? ›

Mohican (also known as Mahican, not to be confused with Mohegan, Mahican: Mã'eekaneeweexthowãakan) is a language of the Eastern Algonquian subgroup of the Algonquian language family, itself a member of the Algic language family.

Are Apaches Native American? ›

The Apache (/əˈpætʃi/) are a group of culturally related Native American tribes in the Southwestern United States, which include the Chiricahua, Jicarilla, Lipan, Mescalero, Mimbreño, Ndendahe (Bedonkohe or Mogollon and Nednhi or Carrizaleño and Janero), Salinero, Plains (Kataka or Semat or "Kiowa-Apache") and Western ...

What do Mohicans call themselves? ›

The Mohicans and Mohegans are two different tribes. "Mohican" sounds a lot like "Mohegan," but that is because British colonists had trouble pronouncing the Mohican name for themselves, Muheconneok, and the Mohegan name for themselves, Mohiingan.

What is the oldest Native American tribe? ›

The Hopi Indians are the oldest Native American tribe in the World.

Why is it called Last of the Mohicans? ›

By James Fenimore Cooper

The title comes from the last line of the novel, when an old Native American says to a gathered crowd: "I have lived to see the last warrior of the wise race of the Mohicans." We guess Cooper thought The Last Warrior of the Wise Race of the Mohicans was a little wordy.

What tribes were in the last of the Mohicans? ›

They called themselves Lenape or Leni-Lenape and were actually a confederacy of three Algonquin tribes — the Munsee, Unami, and Unalachtigo. After they were conquered by the Iroquois in 1720 and had their land encroached upon by the English, they slowly moved west to Oklahoma.

Who kills Magua in Last of the Mohicans? ›

Uncas begins to attack the Huron who killed Cora, but Magua stabs Uncas in the back. Magua tries to leap across a great divide, but he falls short and must cling to a shrub to avoid tumbling off and dying. Hawkeye shoots him, and Magua at last plummets to his death.

What was Indians name in Last of the Mohicans? ›

Magua is a fictional character and the main antagonist in the 1826 novel The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper. This historical novel is set at the time of the French and Indian War. A Huron Indian chief, he is also known by the French alias "Le Renard Subtil" ("The Wily Fox").

Who was Natty Bumppo based on? ›

It is believed that James Fenimore Cooper's character of Natty Bumppo in his Leatherstocking Tales series of books was inspired by David Shipman, a historical person well known by Cooper who often furnished venison and fresh game to Cooper's table and lived and hunted in the area.

Who killed Cora in The Last of the Mohicans? ›

The Hurons reach a precipice, and Cora refuses to continue. Magua threatens to kill her with his knife, but he does not know whether he wants to kill her or marry her. Just as Uncas succeeds in leaping from a ledge and landing at Cora's side, one of the Hurons loses his patience and stabs Cora in the heart.

Where are Hawkeye and Cora when he says the lines I will find you '? ›

24 Where are Hawkeye and Cora when he says the lines 'I will find you...'? Hawkeye, Uncas and Chingachgook then jump down through the waterfall. Reference: Quiz: The Last of the Mohicans.

Why is Chingachgook The Last of the Mohicans? ›

Chingachgook died as an old man in the novel The Pioneers, which makes him the actual "last of the Mohicans," having outlived his son.

What mountain range was The Last of the Mohicans filmed? ›

It was filmed mostly in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. Locations used include Lake James, Chimney Rock Park and The Biltmore Estate. Some of the waterfalls that were used in the movie include Hooker Falls, Triple Falls, Bridal Veil Falls, and High Falls, all located in the DuPont State Recreational Forest.

Where is the bridge in The Last of the Mohicans? ›

Biltmore Estate Historic Bridges

The Bass Pond Bridge is not only a historic bridge, but is striking because of its red brick arch. Designed by Biltmore architect Richard Morris Hunt, it was featured in the movie, Last of the Mohicans.

What time period was The Last of the Mohicans filmed? ›

The Last of the Mohicans is a 1992 American epic historical drama film set in 1757 during the French and Indian War. It was directed by Michael Mann and was based on the 1826 novel The Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757 by James Fenimore Cooper and the 1936 film adaptation, owing more to the film than the novel.

Do Cora and Hawkeye make love? ›

There is no romance between Hawkeye and Cora in the novel. Cora, a mulatto, is passed over by Heyward, who favors her younger sister Alice (played in the movie by Jodhi May).

Why did Duncan sacrifice himself? ›

But unlike Boromir, Duncan didn't do anything wrong. He's a hero who sacrifices himself to save the people he loves (and those he works for).

Who were the Camerons in Last of the Mohicans? ›

Friends of the Mohicans, Alexandra Cameron and John Cameron, and their children, are introduced as housing the three for the night. These people are friends, and they act like it. They speak of their past, and lives for the present and future.

Who was Nathaniel in the last of the Mohicans? ›

The Last of the Mohicans (1992) - Daniel Day-Lewis as Hawkeye (Nathaniel Poe) - IMDb.

What are you looking at sir I'm looking at you miss? ›

Michael Mann) Cora Munro: What are you looking at, sir? Hawkeye: I'm looking at you, miss.

Who made the knives for Last of the Mohicans? ›

Winkler has been making knives since 1977 and is a certified Mastersmith with the American Bladesmith Society and designed and built the knives and tomahawks for the 1992 motion picture The Last of the Mohicans. Winkler was primarily known for his Native-American or pioneer-style influenced designs until 2012.

Is Hawkeye's wife Mockingbird? ›

Hawkeye's finale made canon for the MCU something fans have been theorizing about for quite some time: not only is Hawkeye/Clint Barton's (Jeremy Renner) wife Laura Barton (Linda Cardellini) a former S.H.I.E.L.D. agent, she's actually Agent 19, also known as Mockingbird.

Who is Agent 19 Mockingbird? ›

While many know Bobbi Morse as the superhero Mockingbird or S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent 19, she's also Dr. Barbara Morse, a genius in biology. Her Ph.D. in the field led to her working on Project: Gladiator in the Everglades, the same Super Soldier program that led to Ted Sallis becoming Man-Thing.

What is the significance of the Rolex watch in Hawkeye? ›

The Rolex watch is a hint that Laura Barton could actually be Mockingbird. If Laura Barton was a superhero, the most likely explanation would be that she's Mockingbird. Why? Well, in the comic books, Mockingbird and Hawkeye are often paired together.

Is Hawkeye's wife an avenger? ›

The Hawkeye finale ending confirmed Laura was previously a SHIELD agent known as Agent 19. This was teased throughout the series due to Clint's personal interest in obtaining the Avengers watch and her help on the mission.

Who is Laura Barton Agent 19? ›

"You don't think they need me." Laura Barton, codenamed Agent 19, is a former S.H.I.E.L.D. agent, the wife of Clint Barton, and the mother of Cooper, Lila, and Nathaniel Barton. She and her children lived in secrecy for their own protection against enemies of her husband.

What is Kate Bishop's superhero name? ›

Hawkeye (Katherine Elizabeth "Kate" Bishop) is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer Allan Heinberg and artist Jim Cheung, Bishop first appeared in Young Avengers #1 (April 2005).

Does Laura Barton have powers? ›

Just like Clint, she doesn't usually possess any powers of her own, but her fighting skills and baton prowess makes her more than a match for her husband. Looking back, there were plenty of clues to spot regarding Laura's secret identity.

Why is kingpin so strong? ›

Kingpin doesn't have any previous training in close-quarter combat, but due to his sheer size and muscle, he has an incredible amount of strength. Of course, as mentioned previously, Fisk is still human, which means he can only take a certain amount of damage.

Who is the owner of the Rolex watch in Hawkeye? ›

We've already speculated pretty heavily about one of the big mysteries in Disney+'s Hawkeye: who owns that Rolex watch Clint Barton (Jeremy Renner) was chasing after? And now, thanks to the finale, we finally know. Spoilers past this point, but as suspected, the Rolex belongs to Laura Barton (Linda Cardellini).

Is Bobbi Morse Agent 19? ›

In the comics, Agent 19 is the alias used by Bobbi Morse before she leaves S.H.I.E.L.D. to become a superhero. Eventually, Bobbi starts using the codename Mockingbird and joins the Avengers. Like Clint, Bobbi has a pretty long history in the comics, and for years the pair were in a relationship.

What was the watch Hawkeye gave to his wife? ›

After drawing out the mystery for several weeks, Hawkeye Episode 6 confirms that the Rolex watch Clint Barton (Jeremy Renner) was so intent on recapturing from the Tracksuit Mafia did, indeed, belong to his wife, Laura Barton (Linda Cardellini).

Why did Fisk want the watch? ›

He might also seek to reverse engineer Stark tech for his forces. A simpler explanation is simply that the watch is valuable and highly sought after, and Fisk wasn't interested in acquiring the watch via a purchase, so he sent his men to a black-market auction to steal it.

Is Kingpin a mutant? ›

Unlike most of the heroes and villains in Marvel Comics, Wilson Fisk didn't get super strength from a mutant gene or enhanced senses from radiation. Instead, he has no superhuman abilities.

Is Kate Bishop queer? ›

Kate Bishop is a Queer Fan-Favorite

In the comics, Kate is categorically straight. In many storylines, she's a casual-sex queen, and all of her partners are men. But her close, intimate friendship with legendary comic book lesbian icon America Chavez has many fans sailing under the AmeriKate ship flag.

What was the point of Hawkeye end credit scene? ›

What is Hawkeye's Current End-Credits Scene? Hawkeye kept up with Marvel Studio's typical brand of humor and other elements that anchored the series to the MCU. The series' end-credit scenes were a direct callback to one of the show's earliest moments and feature an extended clip from the satirical Rogers: The Musical.

Did Hawkeye and Black Widow love each other? ›

Hawkeye and Black Widow never dated in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The love they have for each other is very strong but purely platonic. On the other hand, it grew to something bigger in the comics, where they did eventually date before splitting.

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